Billionaire Diaries


This is a conversation with Steve Jobs (if he was still alvie) and Phil Knight. Bare with me, I do not have a twitter and don’t really know how it works.
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Hacked: A look at the News Corp phone tapping scandal


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You often hear people saying that “you can’t ever really trust the media.” Of course each news network has it’s own agenda with every story, stretches the truth to make for juicier news, and often provides very one sided views on important issues. But imagine how much more weight that statement holds when you hear that Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. was accused of phone tapping to illegally obtain information used in the news. It appears we all have a very real and scary reason to not trust the media. Continue reading

Wall Street and Insider Trading


To me, the obvious choice of media material that screams business ethics is the popular movie, “Wall Street.”  It also happens to fit right in with the discussion we have been having recently about stocks and corporate information with the Enron and Lehman Brothers cases.  Charlie Sheen plays the main character, Bud Fox, in the 1987 film.  Fox is a young stockbroker who finds himself working with Gordon Gekko, a major actor on Wall Street, after yearning to get an in with him for years.  Right off the bat, business ethics is evident, when Fox uses inside information to get Gekko’s attention.

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Gossip Magazines & Ethical Missteps


The obsession with knowing everything about the lives of celebrities has manifested in many areas.  From the boom of reality television shows, to the access of social media sites, to the nonstop production of gossip magazines and websites, the demand for this type of information is clear.  This obsession brings up two main issues.  The first being celebrities’ rights to privacy and the second being the purposeful slandering of celebrities in an effort to sell magazines, regardless of the truthfulness of the stories.

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Ruining Personal Rep to Save Face of Network


Yes I am one of those HBO fanatics and enjoy any series that the HBO franchise puts together. And my love for HBO series has not changed with the debut of the new series The Newsroom. If you are not an obsessive HBO fan or a huge admirer of anything coming from the mind of the creator of The West Wing, The Newsroom is a behind-the-scenes look at the people who make a nightly cable-news program. Focusing on the anchor and producer, the series tracks their mission to do the news well in the face of corporate and commercial obstacles-not to mention their own personal entanglements. So how does this unrealistic HBO show have in common with our blog theme this week?

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Tony Soprano’s Ethical Reasoning


When thinking about BGS themes in pop culture, I immediately thought of HBO’s hit series The Sopranos. For those who aren’t familiar, the show centers around Tony Soprano, an Italian-American mobster, and the problems he encounters while heading a criminal organization. While the mafia generally caries a serious negative connotation, the show looks at the notorious crime family from a different angle. Many theories we have looked at concerning business ethics can be applied to Tony’s less than ethical profession.

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What does The Truman Show tell us about company ethics?


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When thinking about ethics in pop culture, the first idea that came to mind was The Truman Show starring Jim Carrey. For those of you who haven’t seen the film, here is the trailer! The protagonist, Truman, is the world’s first true reality TV star who has been filmed since birth in an artificial studio world built just for him. Everyone he has ever known is an actor, every interaction he has ever had is fake, and he is the only one who doesn’t know the truth. Even the environment itself is controlled by the director, Christoff, who manipulates everything from traffic to the weather in order to get higher ratings. The staff (comprised of studio employees, technical directors and actors) go along willingly with every one of Christoff’s demands in his attempt to play God. Despite the fact that what is going on is clearly wrong, everyone being paid to work on the program goes along willingly (with the exception of Truman’s love interest as a young man who tries to tell him the truth). They abandon any shroud of ethical thought and listen to the orders of their leader. Continue reading