Child Soldiers – Societal Impact


Using children in war efforts has a larger impact on society than either of the other subjects. It creates a sense of fear among children not abducted or recruited; it creates a sense of entitlement and loss of childhood for those who are used in the efforts; and it changes how parents, friends and families view their children. In an article I found by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, I learned that “more than 33,000 child soldiers have been demobilized in DRC since 2004.” And this is only in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

The efforts to reintegrate child soldiers back into their old lives presents a difficult task – they are basically brainwashed, tortured, and desensitized while in the army. Girls are raped and when they return, are often viewed as prostitutes. Neither boys nor girls understand the idea of sharing or losing and have to be reintroduced to the simple lessons of childhood. Afterall, their childhood is stripped away from them when they join the army – whether it be by choice or by force.

Around the world, individuals and corporations are becoming increasingly aware of the issue of child soldiers and are financially supporting the cause. The Kony 2012 video was introduced by just one of the many organizations that are fighting to bring awareness to communities around the world and bring aid to the children in need.

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3 thoughts on “Child Soldiers – Societal Impact

  1. I thought there were hoax issues around the Kony 2012 video…

    This is about societal impact, but the resource, the UN document, is a GOVERNMENT source.

  2. But I would argue that reintegration programs focus on the needs of the society as a whole. So although the UN is a governmental organization, their mission is to make things better in society.

    And yes, in my paper i included quite a bit about the Kony 2012 disagreement and used blog sources and newspapers to show the every-day people’s reactions.

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